If you are new to archery, likely, you don’t know much about different arrow tip types. It can be challenging to chase the right ones for target practice.

That is why I will show you all the common types of arrow tips and their uses. So keep reading!

Most Common Types of Arrow Tips:

Field Tips:

Field Points arrowheads

Via Amazon.com

Field points are fairly popular, and they are suitable for a variety of uses - from practicing to small games.

The design of the field tip allows the arrow to have a precise point that flares inside a wide shoulder.

Because of this specific design, the field point doesn’t allow the arrow to stick too much inside the target and absorbs much of the impact.

The best part?

You can save lots of effort to remove it from the target.

Obviously it is perfect for target practice and shooting tournaments.

Note: You should not use it for hunting. As it really can’t quickly kill any game.

If you are looking for more precision and deeper penetration, you should try the field tip rather than a bullet or a target point.

What are they made of?

They are commonly made out of rubber or plastic.

Blunt Arrow Tips

blunt tips

Via bowhunter-ed

Blunt tips are similar to bludgeon tips but are designed differently.

The blunt tips are shaped like a cylinder, without flaring on the bottom.

They are great for hunting small game such as rabbits or birds.

How does it work?

Blunt points kill your prey by shock. But the simple design makes them less attractive for hunters.

Besides that, blunt tips are commonly made out of rubber or plastic.

Judo Arrow Tips

Judo Arrow Tips

Via Amazon.com

The judo point has spring-resembling arms designed to catch tall grass or brush and stop the arrow from burying deep in the ground.

If they hit the ground, they’ll pop up. It means that they don’t get lost and are easier to retrieve.

What are judo points good for?

Judo tips are specifically designed for:

  • Hunting small game (rabbits, birds, and squirrels)
  • Field practice
  • Stump shooting

Glossary: "stump shooting"

Imagine you’re on a treestand, don’t see any deer, and want to practice shooting. You get a judo point and give it a shot to see how it works without worrying about losing your arrows.

You’re practicing “stump shooting,” which helps you to estimate range in the woods.

Note:

I advise you to use the judo tips when you are already experienced in bowhunting, as they are commonly made of steel or aluminum.

Bullet Point Tips

Bullet Point Tips

Via Amazon.com

Bullet point arrow tip is one of the most popular points for small game hunting and target practice, such as foam, grass, bag, or carpet targets.

This arrow tip is called a bullet point because it resembles a standard bullet.

What’s its advantage?

TARGET FRIENDLY.

It can hold up well and reduce the force on impact once it hits the target.

These tips are large and curved, so you are able to remove them easily without lots of sweat and tears.

On the other hand, you can save your targets’ lives as they won’t get destroyed fast before you master your skills.

The best part?

The most convenient thing about them is that they can be a match to the big-game hunting broadheads.

So you’ll get used to the broadhead weight on the field in hunting situations and don’t need to tune your bow sight.

It can be made out of steel, plastic, or rubber.

Combo Point Tips

Combo Point Tips

Via Amazon.com

Combo point tips combine bullet and field tips - in the sense that they are the best of both worlds.

Here are their advantages:

  • Less damage for your target
  • Easy to withdraw the arrows

How does it work?

Combo points have a pointed tip with a small flare at the bottom. It acts as a 2nd hit to slow down and stop the arrow even more.

What are they good for?

Combo tips are great for practicing at the shooting range or 3D tournament, but they can also be used for hunting small games such as birds.

More than that:

The combo points are very aerodynamic. It allows you to shoot straight and brings very accurate results.

They are commonly made out of treated steel.

Pin Points Tips

Pin Points Tips

Via Amazon.com

Pinpoint tips are the ideal arrow tips for shooting competitions and 3D targets - as many professional archers use them.

How does it work?

The pinpoint is designed to have a straight angle from the tip, allowing the arrow easily slide into a narrow ring and get a high score.

Typically it’s longer than the average length of other arrowheads to prevent knocking or kissing out when hitting 3D targets.

Pinpoints are commonly made out of stainless steel.

Bludgeon Arrow Tips

Bludgeon Arrow Tips

Via Amazon.com

Bludgeon arrow tips are specifically created for small game hunting and stump shooting (mentioned above).

How does it work?

Bludgeon tip uses energy transference for hunting instead of cutting or penetrating.

When the bludgeon tip hits your squirrel, it will make a huge impact and blunt force trauma.

It means that it will knock your squirrel out instead of penetrating it.

squirrel shot

Via basspro.com

Even more:

The flared head makes the tip not penetrate at all, and it prevents the tip from breaking or getting lost in the brush.

So never worry that your arrow will disappear again.

And again:

Bludgeon tips come in all shapes and sizes and are mainly made of steel and similar metals.

Bulge Points

Bulge Points

Via eastonarchery.com

Bulge points are designed similarly to bullet points but have a wider center.

Bulge points were specifically designed for target practice and beginner friendly since you can withdraw the arrow as a piece of cake.

Here’s how it works:

The bulge point will hit hard on impact and leave a large hole, but they don’t penetrate too much.

In some cases, it can help you distinguish your impacted points from the others in an archery competition.

Broadhead Arrow Heads:

Fixed blade broadhead:

fixed blade

Via Amazon.com

The fixed blade broadheads are the most popular choice for hunting big game such as elk, deer...

They are simple, mainly used with traditional bows, and are perfect if you want maximum penetration.

Pros:

  • Compact
  • No moving parts and more RELIABLE shots.
  • Highly tough and can deeply get through the bone and hide without bending your tips or arrows. In short, you can make ethical kills easily.

Cons:

The fixed blade broadhead is strong but quickly loses accuracy when fired.

Mechanical broadheads

Mechanical broadheads

Via Amazon.com

The mechanical broadhead is the newest type, featuring hidden blades tucked away during the flight.

When the broadhead impacts, the blades open and expand, creating deeper and wider blood holes.

The mechanical broadhead requires a lot of power, so it’s only reserved for experienced bowhunters.

Pros:

  • Powerful
  • Accurate
  • Reliable (but less than fixed blade)

Cons:

It’s more expensive than fixed blade and needs more maintenance.

Find out more about broadheads here.

Removable broadhead

removable broadheads

Via Amazon.com

Then, we have the removable blade broadheads, which are fairly similar to the fixed blade.

This broadhead can have its blades removed and changed, allowing the hunter to remove the blades without changing the entire arrow tip.

Broadheads are always made out of metal, mainly steel.

Arrow Heads Uses and Comparison:

Arrow Tips

Target practice

Small game hunting

Big game hunting

Field Tips

Yes

Yes

Cell

Blunt Arrow Tips

Cell

Yes

Cell

Judo Arrow Tips

Yes

Yes

Cell

Bullet Point Tips

Yes

Yes

Cell

Combo Point Tips

Yes

Cell
Cell

Pin Points Tips

Yes

Cell
Cell
Bludgeon Arrow Tips
Cell

Yes

Cell

Bulge Points

Yes

Cell
Cell

Broadhead Arrow Heads

Cell

Yes

Yes

Bottom Line:

Now that you know everything about arrow tip types, it’s time to put that knowledge to good use.

There is a time for every arrow tip type, and I hope this article provides you with enough information to know when to use each one.

Nevertheless, now that you have the necessary knowledge, it’s time to take your bow and start practicing.

Use every arrow tip to see how it works!

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About the Author

Hi, I'm Robert Gate, a hunter from Texas and Founder of ArcheryTopic.

I first learned archery from my dad when I was 12 years old. He gave me a Mathew bow as a gift and instantly fell in love with the pursuit.